Tuesday, June 8, 2010

Christianity and extraordinary rendition

I don't know why I never thought of this before, but there is a rather close connection between Christianity and the practice of extraordinary rendition practiced by the United States in the last 10 years.  In case you're not familiar with it, the US has had a program to capture terrorists/insurgents, and send them on secret flights to other countries for interrogation.  That doesn't seem so bad, but when you learn that some of those countries torture the prisoners to make them talk, it becomes known as 'torture by proxy'.  The United States is not supposed to torture prisoners (even though it seems they do anyway), so this is a convenient way of cheating the system.  NATO countries in Afghanistan have also been accused of turning their heads away from torture committed by the Afghan police.

I've always found this pretty terrible, but many Americans do not.  This was surprising to me, considering how very and truly Christian the vast, vast majority of them claim to be.  They use the excuse that it's OK to torture if it might improve their own safety, but I think there might be another reason.  That reason is that it's exactly what they believe their god does!  The Christian god is supposedly all-loving, and Jesus said love thy neighbour and all that nice stuff, but they believe that their god also sends people to a demon for eternal torture for crimes as minor as not believing in it.  That way they can claim their god is good and doesn't torture, just like George W. can try to argue that he did not order torture.

If a Christian disagrees with the extraordinary rendition program, perhaps we should be reminding them that their god is the Universe's biggest organiser of torture by proxy.  That should make them think!  Or maybe not.  They don't seem to care that their god is also the Universe's busiest abortion doctor.  How sad is that?!

6 comments:

Feki said...

Good parallelism between denial of an evil good and an evil government.

But I guess the christian mental conditioning has worked to the extend that political agenda can mimic it without raising opposition or loosing public support. I am not a conspiracist but a few things definitely seemed "staged" and coveniently intertwined with speeches about god and prevailing...

Also, there certainly isn't that much loving-thy-islamic-neighbour around. Either that or "coincidentally", all of the tortured prisoners seem to play for the wrong team in terms of religious delusion. How many christians POWs have been tortured since 2001? Okay, there might not be that many, but I wonder if their treatment would be same. Would it?

Feki said...

by evil good I meant evil god

sorry

Jim said...

Well, Feki, I was just sitting around thinking about all the evil good that I could accomplish, and you had to go and ruin it.

Feki said...

Man, now I really feel bad. Almost waterboarded bad.

Daniel said...

My blogfeed missed out this post it seems:S
We talk about torture a bit in RE, and not surprisingly it is the more dim-witted among us who do not oppose or even advocate torture, often becase they do not see (because it normally is) muslims as people.
Our teacher is a little slow to defend, it usually falls to me.

Daniel said...

And as for evil good, try electrocuting homosexuals to purge them of thier taint and let them be good little sheep of the Fraud.
I only just realised god and fraud rhyme.
The possibilites...